Laser helmets that cure baldness (maybe). Sending smells via text message (It’s real). And the Sacramento Kings crowd-source their draft pick

laserhelmet

It’s been a while since I’ve written about science breakthroughs on the ole’ blog, but now that I’m knee-deep into “Breaking Bad” Season 5 and am inspired by Walter White and Jesse Pinkman’s chemistry brilliance, I’ve been trying to learn more about a subject I was terrible at in school.

OK, that’s a lie. Today’s blog has nothing to do with being inspired by “Breaking Bad.” But I did hear these two new breakthroughs in science on the radio this week, and I think they’re awesome.

First, something that could help me and any other follicly-challenged readers immediately! A California company has come up with what it claims to be the solution – a helmet that fires cool lasers at the wearers scalp to stimulate hair growth.

The Theradome headgear is said to be the only wearable, clinical-strength laser treatment that people can use at home, but it will set buyers back almost $800.

First of all, I would TOTALLY pay $800 for this if it worked, since I throw away $50 every three months on Rogaine which really doesn’t work for me.

Second, I totally wish I could believe that these lasers would target my hair follicles and grow hair, but I’ve been fooled many times before (Although the fact that a NASA scientist is behind Theradome is encouraging, right?)
And third, can you imagine the looks at the store I would get if I was walking around wearing that thing?
Still, I’m intrigued. As is Larry David, Patrick Stewart and many of the rest in my “hair-loss” crew.

 **Next up, something not nearly as useful but equally revolutionary. A Harvard professor named David Edwards has invented a device that will allow cell phone users to send smells via mobile messaging.

This is a real thing: The “oPhone” by Vapor Communications will allow users to mix and match different scents to create more than 300,000 unique aromas to send via mobile message.

The device is designed to sit on a table or desk, and uses small cartridges called oChips (“o” for olfactory) to send 32 “primitive aromas” through the device’s two receivers. These oChips are good for hundreds of uses, and can be replaced, like printer cartriges, when the aroma gets used up.

So let’s say you’re chatting with a pal in London and you want to tell them how good your chocolate chip cookies smell. Voila, you send them a text and boom, it’s like they’re in the kitchen with you.

I love stuff like this that gets invented that absolutely no one, anywhere was clamoring for.
Watch Edwards explain the “oPhone” above, and then wonder if maybe not all Harvard professors are, you know, sane.

**Finally today, I thought this was a very interesting idea. The Sacramento Kings, owned by a very out-of-the-box owner in Ranek Vanadive, decided to do something quite different when it came to this year’s NBA Draft, being held tonight in New York: They asked amateurs (fans, basically) who are very into basketball analytics to come up with ideas and suggestions on who they should choose with the No. 8 pick.
Filmmaker Jonathan Hock has been recording the teams’ front office meeting with these wannabe-GM’s, and it’s nine minutes of really interesting video, I think.
Can’t wait, after watching this, to see what the Kings do with the pick.

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