Daily Archives: July 6, 2018

Good News Friday: The African-American kid who had the cops called on him because he was mowing a lawn? He gets the last laugh. A father’s hilarious method of riding a roller-coaster with his toddler. And a brand-new doctor saves a life on a plane.

Happy Friday, y’all! Hope this abbreviated holiday week finds you well (always confusing when a holiday falls on a Wednesday, do people take the weekend before it off, or the weekend after, or both? I vote for both but what do I know, most of my work Thursday was spent trying to keep the 3-year-old from falling off the kitchen chairs, and seeing if the 8-month-old could crawl across the carpet without bonking his head on the coffee table. I love my life!).

In addition to the wonderful and long overdue news Thursday that Scott Pruitt has resigned as head of the EPA, I have lots of other happy stuff to share today, including that American men are doing awesome at Wimbledon (as I type this five are still alive as we enter the third round).

First, I want to start with my new favorite father. He decided to take his toddler daughter, Kayla, on a virtual roller coaster ride. He put her in a laundry basket, loaded a pretty scary-looking coaster video simulator on his TV, and voila, we have the awesome video below.

This is fantastic, and as close as I ever want to get to riding that roller coaster.

**Next up today, maybe you’ve heard the unconscionable number of times lately that white people have been calling the police on African-Americans, for no reason at all. It’s happened when black individuals have been opening the door to their own apartment, for having a cookout in a public park, and most amazingly, the police were called on an 8-year-old girl selling water “without a permit.”

It happened again recently when 12-year-old African-American boy Reggie Fields and his brother were hired by a woman outside Cleveland to mow their lawn.

As they were working, a white neighbor called the police on them, concerned they were trespassing on her property.

The matter was quickly cleared up, but all the attention has inspired Reggie (who calls his business, delightfully, “Mr. Reggie’s Lawn Cutting Service) to decide to try to start a landscaping business with his brothers and cousins.

And because America is still a great place, a GoFundMe page created to help young Mr. Fields has already raised $37,000 to help him start his business.

From the Buzzfeed story: “Reggie’s mom, Brandy Marie Fields, told BuzzFeed News that she was surprised to see so many people respond to the video this last week. Her son has received support from all over the world, she said.

“They’re just so supportive, because, they said, no 12-year-old should ever have to go through that — period.”

So much more good than bad in the world. So, so much.

**And finally today, how about a hand for a good new doctor, in the right place at the right time. From the great site GoodNewsNetwork.org, comes the tale of Dean LaBarba, who graduated medical school at Loma Linda (Calif.) University School of Medicine a month ago.

On a 12-hour flight from Zurich to Los Angeles with his wife last month when a female passenger sitting close to them said that she didn’t feel well. Before she could get up to use the restroom, she collapsed.

LaBarba immediately rushed to the woman’s side only to find that she didn’t have a pulse. He tried massaging her sternum as a means of improving blood flow – but to no avail.

With the help of another passenger, he had the woman lie across a row of seats so he could begin chest compressions. After six pushes, she started to regain consciousness.

LaBarba, his wife, and the passenger were moved to first class where the newly-graduated doctor monitored her health.

“I remained at her side continually checking on her and asking if she felt any abdominal pain, chest pain, nausea or leg cramps,” LaBarba said. “It’s hard to say what happened in those 15 seconds after she collapsed, but I think she may have experienced a syncope episode.”

A syncope episode is when someone faints as a result of a drop in heart rate or blood pressure. Though the woman was shaken, she made it through the following 10 hours of the flight without any incident.

What a wonderful story. LaBarba was the only doctor on the flight filled with 300 passengers.

That woman is alive because LaBarba was on the flight, too.  You never know when life calls you into action, right?